Aloha Tower http://www.alohatower.com Mon, 24 Aug 2015 21:21:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 PACIFIC BUSINESS NEWS – ALOHA TOWER’S SECOND CHANCE http://www.alohatower.com/pacific-business-news-aloha-towers-second-chance/ http://www.alohatower.com/pacific-business-news-aloha-towers-second-chance/#respond Fri, 07 Aug 2015 00:30:13 +0000 http://www.alohatower.com/?p=85 Aloha Tower’s second chance Hawaii Pacific University is betting $50M that it can do what no one else could—make Aloha Tower Marketplace work. Aug 7, 2015, 12:00am HST Darin Moriki Reporter – Pacific Business News When Hawaii Pacific University opened its new and improved Aloha Tower Marketplace on Monday, it made a $50 million bet... Read more »

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Aloha Tower’s second chance

Hawaii Pacific University is betting $50M that it can do what no one else could—make Aloha Tower Marketplace work.
Aug 7, 2015, 12:00am HST

Darin Moriki
Reporter – Pacific Business News

PBN 8.7

TINA YUEN. Click this image to view more photos from PBN.

When Hawaii Pacific University opened its new and improved Aloha Tower Marketplace on Monday, it made a $50 million bet that it can do something no one else has been able to do: make Aloha Tower work as a mixed-use shopping and dining center.

Unlike past efforts to revive the languishing waterfront complex as a purely retail center, university administrators say they are taking a novel approach that will blend student housing, commercial, retail, and educational spaces together to create a diversified revenue mechanism that they believe will keep Aloha Tower Marketplace sustainable.

Janet Kloenhamer, executive vice president for administration and general counsel for HPU, told PBN that HPU has modeled its Aloha Tower on successful examples of mixed-use college/neighborhood community centers on the Mainland, such as the USC Village in Los Angeles and the addition of Walmart on Campus stores at the Arizona State University, Georgia Tech University, University of Missouri and Virginia Commonwealth University. It also looked at what works in those retail centers around Oahu that balance local and tourist traffic.

“If we were to rely, as I know the Aloha Tower management tried to do in the past, on the cruise ships, we will not be successful,” she explained.

T-shirt shops are not going to cut it, HPU knows.

Now that it has officially debuted with the start of the new academic year, the new multi-use complex will house 278 students in a new dormitory, called the Waterfront Lofts at Aloha Tower Marketplace; multi-purpose community areas; learning and activity areas; and about 65,000 square feet of retail space.

“In terms of development of additional student housing, the cost per bed of this renovation is considerably less than what it would cost to build new,” Kloenhamer explained. “Aloha Tower Marketplace will undoubtedly provide valuable spaces and services to HPU’s students, faculty, and staff. From that perspective, there is no uncertainty about the success of the project.”

So, with less than half of the estimated 160,000 to 170,000 square feet of retail space that Aloha Tower Marketplace once had, how do HPU administrators plan to keep operations afloat?

“Student residences are the largest part of it, and because we have much less retail space, there is not that much rent,” Kloenhamer said. “All the tenants, but certainly the largest tenants, have an expectation of percentage rent, so we are negotiating that — some of them do and will do well, so there’s that element of percentage rent on top of the base rent.”

What has gone before
When Aloha Tower Marketplace opened in 1994, it was — almost — the culmination of a dream dating back to 1978 plans of the Gov. George Ariyoshi administration to revitalize Honolulu’s waterfront.

At the time, it was supposed to be just the first phase of a larger project that was to include two condo towers, an office tower, a hotel, a cruise terminal, and close to 2,000 underground parking stalls, all at a cost of $544 million.

But the execution fell far short of the goal.

The retail center’s developer, Aloha Tower Associates, was only able to develop and open Aloha Tower Marketplace in 1994 before it was issued default notices two years later by the state for unfulfilled obligations and had foreclosure lawsuits filed against it by its lender, Mitsui Trust & Banking, Co.

Since then, no other additions have been made to the waterfront complex, which failed to take off. It changed hands at least four times and was at the center of numerous lawsuits that sought to solve two key issues that were never solved: parking availability and attracting a diverse mix of customers.

Archived websites for Aloha Tower Marketplace capture its best days in 1998, when it had more than 120 retailers and restaurants, including Hong Kong Harbour View Seafood Restaurant, Perfumania, Schlotzsky’s Deli, Wok & Roll, Martin & MacArthur, Sunglass Hut, Sweet Factory, and Wyland Galleries. By 2011, the number of merchants listed on the center’s archived website dropped to 75. By the next year, only 38 retail and dining tenants were left.

To be fair, Aloha Tower wasn’t a death sentence for every tenant.

Michael Tam, who acquired Martin & MacArthur, one of Aloha Tower Marketplace’s original tenants, in 2008, said the company’s decision to leave the retail complex in 2005 was not necessarily the result of issues that plagued some tenants, such as parking and low foot traffic.

“Frankly, it’s not because we had any issues there — the lease came up and we decided to move to Ala Moana, so that’s really what happened,” Tam said. “It was done with no hard feelings or issues with Aloha Tower. Certainly since then, over the past 10 or 12 years, it has changed a lot and, frankly, has had its rough spots. But when we were there, there were a lot of local boutiques selling a mixture of medium- and higher-end products like what we were selling, and it totally made sense. The environment of the marketplace later changed, and I know retailers were having some difficulties there.”

Chef Chai Chaowasaree, who operated Chai’s Island Bistro in Aloha Tower Marketplace for 14 years before shuttering it in 2012, said that business was good when he first opened up his restaurant near the marketplace entrance. But when JTB Hawaii closed its Oli Oli Lounge on the second floor in March 2010 in favor of a new location next to Nordstrom in Ala Moana Center, he recalled that foot traffic through the retail complex came to a screeching halt. At his restaurant, Chaowasaree said business fell by nearly 20 percent.

“After they lost JTB, things were just never the same,” Chaowasaree told PBN. “After JTB moved out, one by one by one, places just closed down, so near the end, there were only a few places left. When our lease was up, we just decided not to stay.”

This time, for sure
HPU administrators say their approach is different, and will work.

“This has been developed with an initial concept in mind as a sustainable concept,” Richard Rapoza, strategic communications director at Hawaii Pacific University, told PBN. “In the past, it was the start of something bigger that didn’t get any bigger, so it kind of failed at the conceptual stage.”

Like its educational mission, HPU also sees their efforts as benefiting the greater good.

“It is in everyone’s interest to see a fulfillment of the original vision for the waterfront,” Kloenhamer said. “We fully expect that the time is right for the master plan of 20+ years ago to become a reality.”

Kloenhamer says HPU’s approach offers more varied revenue streams, and puts less pressure on restaurants and retail to carry the day, than past strategies.

“Investment in infrastructure, not a shopping center, more deliberate attention to tenant mix, strategies around community engagement events, not to exclude the visitor market but prioritize the local community,” Kloenhamer explained to PBN.

Kloenhamer said the estimated 160,000 to 170,000 square feet of retail space in the old Aloha Tower Marketplace has been cut by more than half to 65,000 square feet. A bulk of the other spaces within the mixed-use complex will be used for educational purposes or will be available to lease for events.

“The number and mix of retail tenants that require that kind of ongoing access to parking, coming for breakfast, lunch and dinner, is changing and the scope has changed,” she explained.

HPU will also have a new revenue stream, that previous operators did not, from the 278 students and five university staff members living in Waterfront Lofts. During the first year alone, the university expects to collect about $3.2 million in rental income from students – an amount that, they say, will likely increase through next summer. That shift, Kloenhamer said, will also alleviate some of the parking pressures that previous operators faced, since many of the students living there do not drive and will not be provided parking at the center.

She said the sliding scale rent paid by students, contingent on occupancy, would be the largest revenue source that will be used to keep Aloha Tower Marketplace sustainable in addition to rental income from tenants, leased event spaces and parking rates.

“From our standpoint, we want to put the retail customer ahead and create a better balance to support our restaurant, retail and commercial tenants,” Kloenhamer said.

As for its goals as a university, HPU says its $50 million investment gives it something it doesn’t currently have: a unified, cohesive campus in Honolulu with dormitories. Currently, its students live in residences leased in Waikiki or in dorms at HPU’s Hawaii Loa campus in Windward Oahu.

It may even boost enrollment, though that isn’t an immediate goal. It intends to maintain the number of undergraduate students is has today.

“Both financially and as a matter of preserving the quality of the education we offer our students, substantial growth in undergraduate enrollment is not our best strategy,” Rapoza explained. “We do intend to offer increased opportunities in graduate programs, in order to serve demand in the community. Going forward, we will be examining the balance of our programs to ensure that we are serving the needs of our students, the community, and our university as a whole, and may consider new academic programs, such as summer programming, that will let us make the best and most strategic use of our facilities.”

Though the university did not provide exact figures on how much revenue it would like to generate from Aloha Tower Marketplace, Rapoza said the university expects to see revenue steadily increase as more retail tenants move in. It’s revenue that will be needed to pay off the school’s investment in Aloha Tower, get its finances back on track and pay the state $1 million per year in ground lease rent.

“We do anticipate that this will be a transitional year as retail tenants move in and we proceed with reintroducing the community to the revitalized Marketplace,” said Rapoza. “Overall, we believe that ATM will be a financial asset, an educational asset, and an asset to the community.”

What are the odds?
While Sandy Miano was still running her well-known Nashville Waikiki bar in the Ohana West Hotel, the longtime proprietor said the thought of moving to Aloha Tower Marketplace never really crossed her mind because of its distance away from the tourist mecca. But as other bars around her either closed or moved out of Waikiki, she saw potential in the redeveloped mixed-use complex to pick up where she left off after her country bar’s longtime location was closed for renovations.

“I’m very interested in it because it’s a very important source of light in the city, and I think that, like all big cities, our community is being revitalized,” said Miano, who became the first new Aloha Tower Marketplace tenant to sign a lease with HPU in June. “I think that Honolulu is being revitalized by the Kakaako project, and I think Aloha Tower Marketplace is going to come right along with it all. I think it’s going to be a great place to visitors and local people, and I think the local people are going to enjoy coming there more.”

Some past Aloha Tower Marketplace tenants and operators say they have a positive outlook for what lies ahead when looking at the unique, multi-use operations that will be rolled out in the coming months.

“I think that what lies ahead is the best future that Aloha Tower Marketplace has ever had,” said Linda Gee, managing partner of Standard Commercial LLC, who previously served from 2000 to 2013 as the senior vice president and regional manager for PM Realty Group. The Honolulu-based company conducted the leasing, property and construction management for Aloha Tower Marketplace on behalf of its previous owners, Apollo Real Estate Advisors, for close to three years before it was purchased by Hawaii Pacific University.

Though she declined to discuss previous management practices at the retail complex, Gee explained that the business model and circumstances that HPU administrators now face is completely different.

“When we were managing Aloha Tower Marketplace, it was an entirely different time and place,” Gee said. “We were representing a third-party owner who was no different than any other third-party owner, whereas now, HPU is an owner-occupant and it’s an educational institution — it has a lot more leeway and it has negotiated a different set of terms with the state of Hawaii. It’s just irrelevant, honestly, what we ran into back then — it’s like comparing apples and oranges.”

HPU, too, said it is also confident that has made the right the decision to invest their resources into the revitalized complex, which officially opened to the public on Monday.

“A significant difference for HPU in this situation is that the university is unlike some developers who expect a quick return on investment and are not interested in long term ownership of the property,” Kloenhamer wrote in an e-mail. “With rail in the future, along with the ongoing revitalization of Chinatown and an anticipated harbors master plan, there is every reason to be confident in the long term success of the retail spaces at Aloha Tower Marketplace.”

Others, however, are not as certain.

“It’s hard to say because it depends on how you’re going to promote it and what kind of tenants you have,” said Chaowasaree, who opened Chef Chai in the Pacifica Honolulu condominium complex on Kapiolani Boulevard shortly after closing Chai’s Island Bistro in 2012. “One thing about this kind of situation is that you don’t know what the outcome will be. In my opinion, it already looks like it’s kind of the same because you have restaurants, a bar, and a dormitory upstairs. I don’t know, but you’d be surprised because there are those locations that you think aren’t going to make it and they become a big success, and then there are those locations that have everything going for it and it never pans out.”

“Now they’re definitely going to be relying on the people who live there because there’s going to be a community of people who literally call the Aloha Tower area their residence because they’ll be learning and boarding there,” Tam said. “I definitely think the mix is going to be a little bit different. Sure, you’re still going to get people who come after work from downtown and all of that, but it has yet to be seen how many visitors are actually going to come there because I don’t think the focus is going to be on visitors anymore — it’s going to be for people who are in that community and living there.”

One thing is certain: as HPU embarks on this $50 million crash course in running a shopping center, it’s bound to get an education.

Click here to read the full article. 

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HAWAII PUBLIC RADIO – ALOHA TOWER’S SECOND CHANCE http://www.alohatower.com/hawaii-public-radio-aloha-towers-second-chance/ http://www.alohatower.com/hawaii-public-radio-aloha-towers-second-chance/#respond Fri, 07 Aug 2015 00:24:12 +0000 http://www.alohatower.com/?p=90 By A. KAM NAPIER • AUG 7, 2015 This month, Hawaii Pacific University reopened its version of Aloha Tower Marketplace as a mix of dorm rooms, classrooms and restaurants. What’s the thinking? PBN’s editor in chief, A. Kam Napier, has more. Hawaii Pacific University has bet 50-million dollars it can do something no one else... Read more »

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By A. KAM NAPIER • AUG 7, 2015

HPU_StackedLogo_Color (00000003)This month, Hawaii Pacific University reopened its version of Aloha Tower Marketplace as a mix of dorm rooms, classrooms and restaurants. What’s the thinking? PBN’s editor in chief, A. Kam Napier, has more.

Hawaii Pacific University has bet 50-million dollars it can do something no one else has quite managed to do… make Aloha Tower work.

Kamaaina will remember that Aloha Tower Marketplace opened in 1994 with some fanfare as an attempt to reinvent Honolulu’s industrial waterfront as a shopping and dining playground for both tourists and locals. It worked, for a bit. But from a high of 128 retailers and restaurants in 1998, tendency and foot traffic dwindled until the complex was down to just 38 stores and restaurants in 2012.

HPU now leases the center from the state and has invested 50-million to rebuild it as a kind of miniature college town modeled on similar communities it observed at USC and Georgia Tech. The second floor of the complex has been turned into dormitories, student lounges, classrooms and meeting spaces, all secured for student safety.

The transformation of Aloha Tower gives the university something it has lacked… student housing just steps away from its sizable downtown presence. Until now, HPU students have had to trek in from rented apartments in Waikiki, or HPU’s dorms at its Windward campus.

Meanwhile, you can still hit the town at Aloha Tower for dinner, a sunset drink or a little shopping without being a student. In fact, HPU would love it if you did. It’s aiming for a lively town-and-gown experience, one it feels can both enhance HPU enrollment and make Aloha Tower more interesting. HPU also thinks it has solved some of the problems that plagued past manager of the complex…for more on that, check out the cover story: Aloha Tower’s Second Chance” in Pacific Business News.

Click here to listen to the full story on HPR.com

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KITV4 NEWS – ALOHA TOWER MARKETPLACE GETS A MAKEOVER http://www.alohatower.com/kitv4-news-aloha-tower-marketplace-gets-a-makeover/ http://www.alohatower.com/kitv4-news-aloha-tower-marketplace-gets-a-makeover/#respond Mon, 03 Aug 2015 00:33:40 +0000 http://www.alohatower.com/?p=93 Click here to view KITV4’s report. 

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Click here to view KITV4’s report. 

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HAWAII NEWS NOW – HPU’S ALOHA TOWER DORMS FINISHED AND FURNISHED http://www.alohatower.com/hawaii-news-now-hpus-aloha-tower-dorms-finished-and-furnished/ http://www.alohatower.com/hawaii-news-now-hpus-aloha-tower-dorms-finished-and-furnished/#respond Mon, 20 Jul 2015 00:43:29 +0000 http://www.alohatower.com/?p=97 Posted: Jul 20, 2015 8:29 PM HST By Jim Mendoza Except for some finishing touches, Hawaii Pacific University’s second-floor student housing area at Aloha Tower Marketplace is complete. “We call them lofts, the Waterfront Lofts for our students,” said Sam Moku, HPU’s vice president of university relations. Each of the 84 units has a furnished... Read more »

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Posted: Jul 20, 2015 8:29 PM HST

By Jim Mendoza

HPU_StackedLogo_Color (00000003)Except for some finishing touches, Hawaii Pacific University’s second-floor student housing area at Aloha Tower Marketplace is complete.

“We call them lofts, the Waterfront Lofts for our students,” said Sam Moku, HPU’s vice president of university relations.

Each of the 84 units has a furnished living space, a kitchen with sink, counter and fridge, plus a bathroom and one, two or three bedrooms.

“We’re roughly about almost 85 percent full. And we’re hoping to fill out come the end of August,” Moku said.

Students begin moving in on August 24. Rates for a Fall-Spring-and-Summer package range from about $11,000 to $15,800 per student when utilities are added.

“All of our revenue generated from this property will be used to pay back our debt,” Moku said.

A big chunk of revenue will come from leasing the tower’s commercial space. Dinner cruise company Star of Honolulu and anchor tenants Gordon Biersch and Hooters remain. The Nashville Waikiki bar is moving in, and HPU’s negotiating with Palama Market, Subway, Taco Del Mar and Boston’s North End Pizza.

“We want to make sure that we balance our commercial retailers use with our use as a university,” Moku said.

On the first floor, HPU built a student and faculty lounge with meeting rooms, and multi-purpose space for classes and public meetings.

“This will be a turning point for the university in increasing its marketability,” Moku said.

HPU has a 45-year lease for the property, and 30 years to pay off the general obligation bonds that paid for the $50 million makeover.

Copyright 2015 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

Click here to see the full story on HawaiiNewsNow.com

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CONSTRUCTION TODAY – SWINERTON BUILDERS – HAWAII PACIFIC UNIVERSITY STUDENT APARTMENTS IN THE ALOHA TOWER http://www.alohatower.com/construction-today-swinerton-builders-hawaii-pacific-university-student-apartments-in-the-aloha-tower/ http://www.alohatower.com/construction-today-swinerton-builders-hawaii-pacific-university-student-apartments-in-the-aloha-tower/#respond Tue, 14 Jul 2015 01:52:21 +0000 http://www.alohatower.com/?p=101 Article by Russ Gager Historic landmarks can be difficult real estate projects because society demands preservation, but finding modern uses for a structure whose original purpose is no longer needed – think of a movie palace seating thousands – can be much more difficult than simply preserving the structure. The Aloha Tower – at 10... Read more »

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Article by Russ Gager

Historic landmarks can be difficult real estate projects because society demands preservation, but finding modern uses for a structure whose original purpose is no longer needed – think of a movie palace seating thousands – can be much more difficult than simply preserving the structure.

The Aloha Tower – at 10 stories the highest viewpoint in Honolulu when it was completed in 1926 and now on the Hawaii and National Register of Historic Places – is still the harbormaster’s traffic control center for Honolulu Harbor. But the surrounding Aloha Tower Marketplace, which was built in 1994 where shipping warehouses had once stood, had fallen into disrepair.

“I think it struggled at first being able to keep businesses occupied,” Swinerton Builders Project Executive Kevin Smith relates. Adjacent to the most recognized building in the state – second only to Diamond Head as Hawaii’s most famous landmark – the Aloha Tower Marketplace was purchased by Hawaii Pacific University (HPU) in late 2011 with the goal of renovating the little-used second floor of the two-story retail development for 84 student housing units.

“When the project first started in March 2014, there were only two restaurants that were currently operating and around a dozen small retail stores,” Smith remembers. “The rest of the marketplace was just empty or abandoned for a number of years.”

CLAY ROOF

The $46 million renovation of the marketplace’s four buildings, connected on their second floors with covered walkways, began in March 2014 with demolition of the second floor’s interior. “Once we started doing some exploratory demolition work, we quickly discovered that the roof was like a sieve, leaking everywhere,” Smith recalls. “We had to add into the scope of work a roof replacement. The roof was clay tiles, which were aesthetically a very nice, good-looking roof. The problem was that over time, especially with the winds and being close to the ocean, it just started to deteriorate and leak. To preserve the roof’s appearance but improve performance, a similarly-colored premium Sarnafil PVC roof with ribs was selected.

“We did have to do a complete gut of the majority of the second floor’s inside spaces,” Smith continues. “We kept most of the shell, but there were some areas where we removed and replaced or modified the exterior – primarily for the new doors and new glass – to make the student apartments and do some exterior walls, as well.”

As the project began, HPU decided to alter the original concept for the first floor. “Those spaces would be changed from the old retail and restaurant space to a combination of welcome center, a student living area, a faculty lounge, as well as public spaces and restrooms,” Smith says. “Then a few months ago, Barnes and Noble agreed to come in to operate the university bookstore.”

STUDENT DORMS

Swinerton Builders is renovating approximately 110,000 square feet on the second floor of the marketplace into 84 loft-style student housing units measuring from 300 square feet to nearly 1,100 square feet. Each unit will include a bathroom, a kitchen sink and a microwave oven. Group dining areas for students and executives are planned for the second floor.

Businesses on the first floor will be available for both university customers and the public, and will include small food establishments serving pizza, coffee, sandwiches, noodles, yogurt or grab-and-go food. The second floor is scheduled for completion in June and the first floor in August, so the new facility will be ready for the university’s fall semester.

Given the project’s location adjacent to Honolulu’s principal commercial harbor, Swinerton Builders had to coordinate the project with many different agencies, including the Hawaii Department of Transportation and the Department of Homeland Security. “There were a lot of rules, regulations and restrictions, and it was pretty challenging trying to get the job to stay on schedule and understand all the dynamics of working at the pier,” Smith concedes.

The marketplace has a steel structure over a concrete foundation on piers. The flooring is metal deck topped with two-and-a-half inches of concrete. The interior has concrete shear walls, with an exterior insulation finishing system on the outside. Several non-functioning escalators were removed, and gravel and concrete poured for a foundation where they had been. Approximately 30 subcontractors are working on the project.

RESTAURANTS REMAINING

A Gordon Biersch Brewery Restaurant and Hooters restaurant were at the marketplace before the renovation began and are remaining there. “Gordon Biersch was very receptive to working with us and has been a great partner throughout the project,” Smith says. “But it has always been a concern trying to do construction with people coming in and out all day.”

Swinerton Builders worked with architect Group 70 International to modify the project’s budget through preconstruction and a design/assist approach. “The market in Hawaii has been red-hot, and everyone is really busy,” Smith reports. “When things get busy, prices really escalate. So one of the challenges was just trying to work with HPU to keep the intention of the design but come up with cost-effective solutions as to how to construct the project.”

Smith attributes the success of the project to strong collaboration with Group 70, HPU and the subcontractors, and Swinerton’s leadership. “This job is unique,” Smith concludes. “It’s historical. An Aloha Tower renovation is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. To me, it’s been pretty special turning this from an area that has not been very successful into a place that is going to be full of life, which is what HPU’s whole vision is – creating this place that is full of life.”

Click here to view the full article at ConstructionToday.com

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KHON2 – RETAIL TENANTS TO MOVE IN TO REVITALIZED ALOHA TOWER MARKETPLACE http://www.alohatower.com/khon2-retail-tenants-to-move-in-to-revitalized-aloha-tower-marketplace/ http://www.alohatower.com/khon2-retail-tenants-to-move-in-to-revitalized-aloha-tower-marketplace/#respond Thu, 25 Jun 2015 01:58:45 +0000 http://www.alohatower.com/?p=103 By Web Staff Published: June 25, 2015, 1:10 pm Updated: June 25, 2015, 7:50 pm Hawaii Pacific University announced Thursday that a growing list of retail tenants are moving forward with leases that will bring their businesses to Hawaii Pacific University’s revitalized Aloha Tower Marketplace, scheduled to open this fall. Country-and-western bar Nashville Waikiki plans... Read more »

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By Web Staff

Published: June 25, 2015, 1:10 pm Updated: June 25, 2015, 7:50 pm

HPU_StackedLogo_Color (00000003)Hawaii Pacific University announced Thursday that a growing list of retail tenants are moving forward with leases that will bring their businesses to Hawaii Pacific University’s revitalized Aloha Tower Marketplace, scheduled to open this fall.

Country-and-western bar Nashville Waikiki plans to open in late July. In addition, Taco Del Mar, Subway, Boston Pizza, a ramen shop and rotisserie chicken restaurant; and Palama Express, a convenience/express store of the larger Palama Market, plan to sign leases in the next few weeks.

An urgent care medical clinic is finalizing negotiations to open a location at the marketplace.

The HPU college bookstore, operated by Barnes and Noble College, will also be a prominent presence at the Marketplace.

In addition to retail space, the renovated Aloha Tower Marketplace includes rooms for approximately 280 students in the Waterfront Loft residences on the second floor, as well as learning facilities and gathering places for the university and the community.

This fall’s opening of the Aloha Tower Marketplace also coincides with HPU’s 50th anniversary, which will be celebrated in September.

Click here to view the article at KHON2.com

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KHON2 – HAWAII PACIFIC UNIVERSITY TURNS ALOHA TOWER INTO RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY http://www.alohatower.com/khon2-hawaii-pacific-university-turns-aloha-tower-into-residential-community/ http://www.alohatower.com/khon2-hawaii-pacific-university-turns-aloha-tower-into-residential-community/#respond Wed, 10 Jun 2015 02:11:42 +0000 http://www.alohatower.com/?p=111 By Kristine Uyeno Published: June 10, 2015, 6:07 pm Updated: June 10, 2015, 6:13 pm Construction is almost finished on Hawaii Pacific University’s $50 million project at Aloha Tower Marketplace. HPU is turning the iconic site into rooms for hundreds of students. There’s also going to be a bookstore and restaurants. Behind the construction barriers... Read more »

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By Kristine Uyeno

Published: June 10, 2015, 6:07 pm Updated: June 10, 2015, 6:13 pm

HPU student center rendConstruction is almost finished on Hawaii Pacific University’s $50 million project at Aloha Tower Marketplace.

HPU is turning the iconic site into rooms for hundreds of students. There’s also going to be a bookstore and restaurants.

Behind the construction barriers is a new community that will be unveiled this summer.

The university gave us a sneak peek at one of the rooms located on the second floor of the marketplace, a five-person waterfront loft.

Complete with a living space, kitchenette, bathrooms and bedrooms, HPU officials says it’s bigger than the typical dorm room.

“There are beds and workstations and wardrobes are here as well. This particular unit has a view of the Diamond Head side,” said Marites McKee, dean of students.

For the past year, crews have been turning this landmark into 74 housing units for 278 students who will move in on August 24.
The cost ranges from about $3,500 a semester to $14,000 a year, depending on the room type.

The HPU lofts at Aloha Tower are about 75 percent complete. Officials hope it will be an anchor for the university as well as for the community.

There will also be educational spaces for students and local groups.

“We will have not only classroom programs in there for our students, but we welcome the neighborhood board,” said Sam Moku, university relations vice president.

“Did you get some kind of negative comment or negative feedback about turning this into a dormitory?” KHON2 asked.

“I think because we are on public lands, we want to make sure we use it and steward these public lands properly,” Moku said.

Barnes and Noble College, which is smaller than the regular bookstore, will be located on the bottom floor, and Hooters, Gordon Biersch and Star of Honolulu will remain as tenants.

More restaurants will fill the space at Aloha Tower and officials will announce the new tenants within the next two weeks.

Click here to watch the full story on KHON2.com

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PACIFIC BUSINESS NEWS – HAWAII PACIFIC UNIVERSITY GIVES A SNEAK PEEK OF ALOHA TOWER MARKETPLACE DORMS http://www.alohatower.com/pacific-business-news-hawaii-pacific-university-gives-a-sneak-peek-of-aloha-tower-marketplace-dorms/ http://www.alohatower.com/pacific-business-news-hawaii-pacific-university-gives-a-sneak-peek-of-aloha-tower-marketplace-dorms/#respond Mon, 11 May 2015 02:38:24 +0000 http://www.alohatower.com/?p=121 May 11, 2015, 6:23pm HST Duane Shimogawa Reporter – Pacific Business News Hawaii Pacific University is a little more than three months away from moving its first group of students into the newly-renovated Aloha Tower Marketplace in Downtown Honolulu. Sam Moku, vice president of university relations, took PBN on a tour of the newly renovated... Read more »

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May 11, 2015, 6:23pm HST
Duane Shimogawa
Reporter – Pacific Business News

HPU_StackedLogo_Color (00000003)Hawaii Pacific University is a little more than three months away from moving its first group of students into the newly-renovated Aloha Tower Marketplace in Downtown Honolulu.

Sam Moku, vice president of university relations, took PBN on a tour of the newly renovated second floor of the marketplace that will house 278 students in 74 units, most of which have views of Honolulu Harbor and the ocean.

HPU plans to open Aloha Tower to residential students on Aug. 24.

The two types of units, lofts, which will have kitchens, and studios, which won’t, will be mostly for upperclassmen, he said.

Tenants such as Gordon Biersch, Hooters, Star of Honolulu and The Cab will remain at the marketplace, with a slew of new shops and restaurants, including a Barnes & Noble bookstore joining these existing tenants.

Moku said that there won’t be much movement from HPU’s current office spaces in Downtown Honolulu to the marketplace. He and a few others will eventually relocate to Aloha Tower, but the school’s current footprint will mostly remain the same.

Moku also noted that there may be some movement, in terms of classes, from its Hawaii Loa campus in Windward Oahu to the marketplace.

Still, there is a commitment to Windward Oahu, as it will continue to play an integral part of the state’s largest private university.

The $50 million Aloha Tower redevelopment project will also include building classrooms, an admissions office, a housing office, student center/learning commons, student organization spaces, a library/computer lab, book store and fitness center.

First-floor improvements include replacing a portion of the retail and restaurant spaces with HPU academic and support spaces with the second floor being converted to 83 student and faculty residences, accommodating some 300 residents.

The Pier 10 building is slated to include HPU multi-purpose spaces, including theater/lecture hall space for up to 250 people and a box office.

Honolulu-based Group 70 International is the architect for the project, while San Francisco-based Swinerton Builders is the general contractor.

Click here to read the full story. 

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KITV4 – HPU’S REDEVELOPMENT OF ALOHA TOWER MARKETPLACE TAKING SHAPE http://www.alohatower.com/kitv4-hpus-redevelopment-of-aloha-tower-marketplace-taking-shape/ http://www.alohatower.com/kitv4-hpus-redevelopment-of-aloha-tower-marketplace-taking-shape/#respond Mon, 11 May 2015 02:31:28 +0000 http://www.alohatower.com/?p=119 May 11, 2015 By Andrew Pereira HONOLULU —Nearly a year after breaking ground, Hawaii Pacific University’s redevelopment of iconic Aloha Tower Marketplace is nearing completion. The university expects students to move in for the fall semester by Aug. 24. It’s been nearly a year since Hawaii Pacific University broke ground on the multi-million dollar project... Read more »

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May 11, 2015

By Andrew Pereira

HPU_StackedLogo_Color (00000003)HONOLULU —Nearly a year after breaking ground, Hawaii Pacific University’s redevelopment of iconic Aloha Tower Marketplace is nearing completion. The university expects students to move in for the fall semester by Aug. 24.

It’s been nearly a year since Hawaii Pacific University broke ground on the multi-million dollar project at Aloha Tower Marketplace.

“We’re coming up on our 50th anniversary, so the construction timeline is on schedule and we’re ready to move,” Sam Moku, HPU’s vice president for university relations, said Monday.

Once finished, the $50 million project will house 278 students in 74 loft-type units. All of the lofts are located on the second floor of the marketplace.

“They’re all divvied up into different spaces,” said Moku. “Some have two beds in them, some have five beds in the units and each student has their choice of where and which side they want to live on, depending on noise, et cetera.”

The second-floor residences will be for students only and feature 24-hour security. But on the bottom floor, there’s plenty of lounge and classroom space available. HPU is also hoping to sublease 30,000 square feet of commercial retail space to local businesses and national brands. Right now, Gordon Biersch, Hooters and Star of Honolulu remain, with Barnes & Noble starting construction next month.

“Scott Hayashi, who’s our asset manager, is leasing between 300 to 3,000 square feet and as of now, I know he has a whole list of mom-and-pop shops coming on board,” said Moku.

After completion of the project by contractor Swinerton Builders, the university says the newly refurbished marketplace will become its official gateway. And while nearly 300 students will call the area home, HPU wants to make sure they don’t make traffic in the area even worse.

“We’re working with the city on the bike share program, (and) we will have one of their bike share stations here as it starts to move forward,” said Moku. “We are setting a policy for our students that they will not be allowed to have vehicles, or park their vehicles. We want them to use public transportation, you know, mopeds, bikes and their legs.”

Although HPU owns all of the buildings at Aloha Tower Marketplace, the state maintains control of the land. The university is currently in negotiations with the Hawaii Department of Transportation to extend its 40-year lease. Currently, HPU pays the state about $1 million per year.

Click here to watch the full story on KITV.com

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PACIFIC BUSINESS NEWS – HAWAII PACIFIC UNIVERSITY UNVEILS WATERFRONT ALOHA TOWER MARKETPLACE DORMS http://www.alohatower.com/pacific-business-news-hawaii-pacific-university-unveils-waterfront-aloha-tower-marketplace-dorms/ http://www.alohatower.com/pacific-business-news-hawaii-pacific-university-unveils-waterfront-aloha-tower-marketplace-dorms/#respond Mon, 11 May 2015 02:20:41 +0000 http://www.alohatower.com/?p=115 May 12, 2015, 2:16pm HST Duane Shimogawa Reporter – Pacific Business News Hawaii Pacific University is putting its finishing touches on its $50 million renovation of the Aloha Tower Marketplace in Downtown Honolulu, which includes adding 74 dormitory units to the second floor, that will house 278 students. PBN got a sneak peek at the... Read more »

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May 12, 2015, 2:16pm HST
Duane Shimogawa
Reporter – Pacific Business News

5.11 PBN

TINA YUEN PBN. Click this image to view the full PBN slideshow

Hawaii Pacific University is putting its finishing touches on its $50 million renovation of the Aloha Tower Marketplace in Downtown Honolulu, which includes adding 74 dormitory units to the second floor, that will house 278 students.

PBN got a sneak peek at the new dorms this week. Click on the photo for a slideshow.

HPU, which plans to open Aloha Tower to residential students on Aug. 24, is charging students a housing fee for units ranging from $11,150 to $14,080 for fall, spring and summer terms, from Aug. 24 to Aug. 9, 2016.

The state’s largest private university also offers a two-term plan from Aug. 24 to May 14, 2016, starting from $7,070 to $10,600. There’s also another plan involving one term, for a fall or spring, from Aug. 24 to Dec. 31 or from Jan. 8, 2016 to May 14, 2016, starting from $3,535 to $5,300.

The units include lofts with single, double and triple occupancy rooms and studios with double occupancy rooms.

Click here to view the full story.

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